What should a developer know before building a public web site? – Stack Overflow

What should a developer know before building a public web site? – Stack Overflow.

In testing the new GigJunkie site before launching it (soon), I found my team debating to the point of near argument some of the finer points of our website which this topic thread would have helped us greatly, had we read before.

As I approach this weekend’s CAMDUG meetup which is an Open Space Coding Day with Alan Hemmings and other .Net Cambridge developers I’m very excited about working with folks on the topic of a public website for CAMDUG.

I’m hoping that my contributions to the day can be helped having read this article now. StackOverflow.com continues to impress me with its wealth of developer knowledge.

Tip of the day: Double question mark – Mikael Söderström

This tip on using the double-quotation marks in C# helped me a bit today when it came to integrating new code for an ASP.Net web application with legacy data access code that I was unsure about the quality of. The data access code that I was referencing  may or may not have null value checking, and there was no time because of an impending deadline to do code-review or quality control revision on it, but by using the ‘??’ check on values returned by it and some constant parameter values hydrated by web.config appSetting values II was able to implement default behaviour in my code for objects which did not get what was expected from the data access layer.

Of course this is just a band aid. The solution really lies in cleaning up that misbehaving code and defining standard contracts for behaviour between tiers that all the software team agrees to and which consistent code reviewing will reveal deviations from at earlier stages before integration, and perhaps the whole team becomes better developers because of it since we’re discipling ourselves on good practices for writing quality code.

Use TARDIS Tweet To Back-Schedule Twitter Submissions And Usurp Your Rivals | Twittercism

Use TARDIS Tweet To Back-Schedule Twitter Submissions And Usurp Your Rivals | Twittercism.

Definitely useful for all of us busy folks!

Google Street View available for the UK

It’s a little cool, and slightly uncomfortable, to see London is now mapped out and available for Google Street View.

I am a newcomer to London,  and often find myself walking a bit to find unknown streets and places, a task I’d much rather prefer to do virtually from the warm confines of my home or office than on the cold breezy streets.

When you see photo layouts of directly up to your front door it does become a little unsettling for some reason, despite the usefulness of it all.

SQL Server 2005 – Troubleshooting Orphaned Users

I always seem to keep forgetting when I backup from one server and restore to a new server that SQL Server 2005 will recreate the users from the original server, and they become ‘orphaned’ as they don’t match to the similarly named user on my system automatically, and thus cause an error when an ASP.Net application tries to use its web.config settings to access the database.

This Microsoft Support article gives the steps needed to fix this orphaned user issue as well as create it in the first place, so this is a cool resource to have when training others on the issues they may face and how to mitigate them when wearing their database administrator hat.

What is a “Predicate delegate” – bytes

Thinking in terms of Delegates was always a bit of a challenge to me. So when I hit the Predicate parameter when trying to using a List<X>.FindAll(XType y).

The example given in discussion on this article went a long way to clearing this up. If I get more answers like this from Bytes I might start using this as my secondary source of programming answers after StackOverflow.

Customising the debug and run an ASP.NET MVC Application

I tend to use F5 to debug my code, my two teammates have a preference to have the codebase as a virtual directory in IIS and make changes to their code in Visual Studio and then reload the page in a browser to analyse the returned results.

Which is the better technique? Certainly my co-workers had a  point that by running using Cassini instead of IIS I was opening up myself to bugs popping up when the application was deployed to a real IIS box on testing and some IIS-specific behavior arose.

But why must I hassle myself with attaching IIS to the W3wp.exe process every time I want to do a line-by-line debug my code? And I always want to be debugging, especially in this new realm of integrated ASP.Net MVC where debugging a View means you have to worry about if the bug lies in your ASP.Net code, your JQuery code, or the service(s) your .ajax or .getJSON calls are making. I didn’t mind the hassle of having to recompile every time a change needed to be made inside the Controller or Business Logic layers once it meant I could track the state of my application during events as closely as possible.

Turns out we can have it both ways. These recommendation from Stephen Walter, although set on the topic of running an ASP.Net MVC Application specifically, are useful for any developer looking to customise the debug and run process when using Visual Studio 2008. So my coworkers and I will both be happy, because now they’ll be readily able to debug their code in real time (and engaging in a better coding practice at the same time) and I’ll be running my debug sessions on top of IIS to remove any possible hiccups from using Cassini for testing.

The settings are available on the Web tab on the Web Application Project’s properties page (ASP.Net MVC or not)  and to do this I have to make sure it is set to use a local IIS virtual directory (which I’ll make right there if it isn’t set already) and that I enable the check box that allows me to make code changes without the need to stop debugging and recompile.